Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

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Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby Brian D. » Sat Mar 18, 2017 2:40 pm

Specifically for me today, a pin punch and fairly heavy hammer. I usually put one of the factory, extended model 34 slide release levers on the other models. Have done the job maybe 25 times now, for myself and tinker-phobic friends. Usually the trigger pin will push right out with even a plastic punch; once I needed a few taps with a small hammer to complete the task. Today I met a model 17 with (presumably) an oversized pin, and undersized hole in the frame or internal part. It took several whacks with a 16 ounce claw hammer, and three or four F-bombs, to get the pin going. I've heard that can happen but was always skeptical.

Maybe this would be a good thread to share similar stories of Murphy's Law comes to gunsmithing. Jump right in.
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby Mr. Glock » Sat Mar 18, 2017 3:21 pm

Do you wiggle the slide release while you try to push it out? It rides in a groove in the pin.
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby Brian D. » Sat Mar 18, 2017 3:32 pm

Mr. Glock wrote:Do you wiggle the slide release while you try to push it out? It rides in a groove in the pin.


Yes I tried that after thinking about where my smithin' hammer was, but before going to retrieve it. Consider mass production tolerances: A pin that came out .002" too big wouldn't be thrown away, the press at the factory would shove it right in. Even if some part of its channel happened to be a few thousandths on the small side.

But enough of my experience today, I wanna read some others on this general subject now.
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby Brian D. » Sat Mar 18, 2017 8:16 pm

Okay here's another one: Same part (pin that holds trigger in frame) but different semiautomatic handgun: The Browning Hi Power. Its removal is necessary on all the modern ones, circa 1980-something, if you want to get rid of the magazine disconnect "safety" feature**.

As time has gone by, Browning/FN must have started using huge presses, or the hammer of Thor, to get that pin into the frame during manufacture. Their lawyers must not want buyers to negate the mag disconnect, no matter how much better it makes the trigger pull. Removal of said pin is even tougher on the guns which have the EPOXY based black finish. After doing a handful of those over a decade or so, I have sold the trampoline, 16lb. sledge hammer, and 12 foot step ladder needed to accomplish the task. Super glue the punch pin to the proper spot, climb the ladder with sledge, jump off, hit punch with hammer, land on trampoline, bounce back to top of stepladder, repeat as many times as needed.

Okay, it's not quite that difficult, but.. :lol:

**Some people don't want to negate the disconnect for fear of having that fact used against them after a defensive shooting incident, fine by me.
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby jeep45238 » Sat Mar 18, 2017 9:29 pm

Brian D. wrote:Okay here's another one: Same part (pin that holds trigger in frame) but different semiautomatic handgun: The Browning Hi Power. Its removal is necessary on all the modern ones, circa 1980-something, if you want to get rid of the magazine disconnect "safety" feature**.

As time has gone by, Browning/FN must have started using huge presses, or the hammer of Thor, to get that pin into the frame during manufacture. Their lawyers must not want buyers to negate the mag disconnect, no matter how much better it makes the trigger pull. Removal of said pin is even tougher on the guns which have the EPOXY based black finish. After doing a handful of those over a decade or so, I have sold the trampoline, 16lb. sledge hammer, and 12 foot step ladder needed to accomplish the task. Super glue the punch pin to the proper spot, climb the ladder with sledge, jump off, hit punch with hammer, land on trampoline, bounce back to top of stepladder, repeat as many times as needed.

Okay, it's not quite that difficult, but.. :lol:

**Some people don't want to negate the disconnect for fear of having that fact used against them after a defensive shooting incident, fine by me.



One day I'd like to get a BHP back into the safe - I'll be watching if you put up any sale ads in the future :)
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby calvin56 » Sun Mar 19, 2017 5:50 am

Brian D. wrote:**Some people don't want to negate the disconnect for fear of having that fact used against them after a defensive shooting incident, fine by me.

An easier way is to cut exactly one coil off the spring, same effect, but all the original parts are still in place. A two pound BHP is just as crisp as a 1911. A few select shooters can tell the difference only because one is a straight pull, the other pivots.
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby Brian D. » Sun Mar 19, 2017 6:02 am

calvin56 wrote:
Brian D. wrote:**Some people don't want to negate the disconnect for fear of having that fact used against them after a defensive shooting incident, fine by me.

An easier way is to cut exactly one coil off the spring, same effect, but all the original parts are still in place. A two pound BHP is just as crisp as a 1911. A few select shooters can tell the difference only because one is a straight pull, the other pivots.


For what it's worth I also just don't like the aspect of the gun being rendered useless if the magazine is removed, especially by a too-close attacker. In that circumstance, however unlikely, I want that round in the chamber to be available.

Okay now I drifted into tactics, let's get back to gunsmithing gone bad. Or difficult or funny, etc.
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby schmieg » Sun Mar 19, 2017 9:26 pm

Brian D. wrote:
Mr. Glock wrote:Do you wiggle the slide release while you try to push it out? It rides in a groove in the pin.


Yes I tried that after thinking about where my smithin' hammer was, but before going to retrieve it. Consider mass production tolerances: A pin that came out .002" too big wouldn't be thrown away, the press at the factory would shove it right in. Even if some part of its channel happened to be a few thousandths on the small side.

But enough of my experience today, I wanna read some others on this general subject now.

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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby CCIman » Wed Mar 22, 2017 1:40 pm

One does what one must, no absolutes in life, no apologies...I too have used a tack hammer to help with tight pins on both Glocks and AR's.
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby Bruenor » Wed Mar 22, 2017 8:34 pm

A guy at the club purchased a new AR15, we had to tap out one of the take-down pins with a tool. I've never run across take-down pins before that fit so tight you couldn't start it out by pressing it with your finger. Recommended he contact the manufacturer because that was definitely NOT normal.

Getting the barrel off the receiver of my Rem700 took a bit more leverage than expected. Fashioned a tool from some bar stock that was laying around the garage to gain a better grip and more leverage. That did the trick, and made things move.
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So far Murphy hasn't reared his head on any of my projects, aside from make some parts more difficult to move than they should have been, but given a big enough hammer or enough leverage, still managed to get the job done.
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby NavyChief » Sun Apr 09, 2017 12:30 pm

Part I
About twenty (or so) years ago I decided my S&W Model 13 snubbie needed to be broken down to parade rest for cleaning. Dunno why. Just seemed like a good idea at the time. So as I'm prying the trigger block out (yes, I said "prying" - don't judge) the return spring (which I didn't know was in there) went "spinggggg" and became what my gunsmith ( who I'd yet to meet) called "air soluble." Now I was doing said disassembly on our screened in patio. That had gray indoor/outdoor carpet. Yeah. I heard it hit the screen - over there - somewhere.Some of you know the size of that spring. For those that don't, think of a grain of rice. Now color it gunmetal gray. Now go look for it on that gray carpet.
Believe it or not I found it. Yay me! But...

Part II
So I have now collected all the parts that comprise a Model 13 revolver. Time for re-assembly, right? Well, no. Remember that spring? Well, it seems re-installation is made, if not possible, at least an order of magnitude easier with a special tool available from Brownell's. Who knew? And oh by the way, a pair of needle nose vice grips and an 1/8" flat blade screwdriver do NOT comprise an acceptable substitute for said tool. Which leads us to how I ended up meeting my gunsmith in Florida. I took him a shoe box full of revolver parts. He really was pretty cool about it - sorted through the parts, shrugged his shoulders and said, "No biggie, all the parts're here and none of 'em are broken."
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby CCIman » Thu Apr 13, 2017 8:27 pm

I have reamed the holes on my AR lower receiver with a drill bit to allow the pin to fit on one of my uppers. Just a tiny bit.

I have also reamed the holes in a Timney trigger pack for the Tavor to also allow the pins to go in smoother. Just a little bit to make up for the manufacturing specs just being a little off.

Bruenor wrote:A guy at the club purchased a new AR15, we had to tap out one of the take-down pins with a tool. I've never run across take-down pins before that fit so tight you couldn't start it out by pressing it with your finger. Recommended he contact the manufacturer because that was definitely NOT normal.

Getting the barrel off the receiver of my Rem700 took a bit more leverage than expected. Fashioned a tool from some bar stock that was laying around the garage to gain a better grip and more leverage. That did the trick, and made things move.
Image

So far Murphy hasn't reared his head on any of my projects, aside from make some parts more difficult to move than they should have been, but given a big enough hammer or enough leverage, still managed to get the job done.
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby gaptrick » Mon Apr 17, 2017 1:48 pm

Avoid "reaming" with a 2 fluted drill bit... you'll end up with elongated holes....
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Re: Glock work..sometimes you do need tools.

Postby jeep45238 » Mon Apr 17, 2017 8:34 pm

gaptrick wrote:Avoid "reaming" with a 2 fluted drill bit... you'll end up with elongated holes....



This, times a hundred or so. A proper 6 flute is needed to do the job right, and they're not cheap.
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